Permanent Strangulation

When discussing how to transition to new systems or environments, one of my favorite approaches is the strangler pattern because it allows for a low risk approach to transition to the new environment in a piecemeal fashion. There is a hidden risk with this approach, and it is the price tag is increased tech debt adding complexity and maintenance costs. …

Looking for help on Facebook

I’m going to share part of a conversation I had while attending KubeCon last fall. We sapped stories on our experiences with esoteric hardware, but there were two that came to mind. The first looked at a regional bank that happened to have a VAX based system running their daily transactions. There was an issue that required rebooting the system …

Strangling Your Data

A while ago, I wrote a post looking at different ways to modernize an application while retaining preexisting functionality.  One of these techniques is called the strangler patterns which gets its name from the strangler fig. The idea being: Create a shim for the current system. Record and/or replicate the data within the shim. As the new replacement services come …

Strangler Fig

The Strangler Pattern and Legacy Migration Strategies

Following up on my previous post on Legacy Migration Strategies, I will be talking about the strangler pattern. At its core, the approach is to take your original application, and replace it piece-by-piece by “strangling” it to death with each new component. The biggest reason for architecting with this approach in mind is to minimize the impact of the transition …

Legacy Migration Strategies

What do you think of when you hear about a legacy system? A machine in a corner with a broom handle holding the power switch on because the switch slips to off when nobody’s looking, and they don’t want to be the person to remove it.  Perhaps it is a user account management system that sits on a Sun Ultra …